Posts Tagged ‘mobile’

How banks can use digital expertise to increase sales, engender loyalty and push up profits.

October 22, 2015

Up to 90% of interactions between banks and customers now take place over a mobile phone, leaving banks with little face time, the time they traditionally used to sell their products.

But this massive shift should not be a threat. It can play to a bank’s digital strength, creating opportunities to sell better, in a more timely and targeted manner, create more loyalty, and generate greater long-term profitability.

Digital banking delivers a consistency of service, depth of customer knowledge and the facility to make real-time reactive offers. Combined, these make for a powerful sales opportunity.

A sales team will always have good and poor performers. The good seller reacts to the customer, gains and uses insight into the customer’s needs and adapts the offer accordingly. When someone walks into a branch to deposit a large cheque, a good teller will work out whether to offer savings and investment products versus maybe mortgage deals or insurance by seeking to understand more about the deposit. A less successful teller will just take the cheque, missing the up-sell opportunity.

A digital system can be programmed to behave like the good seller, to spot an opportunity and make suitable offers. It can even be self-learning, working out that something didn’t work the first time and adapting accordingly.

Not only does the bank benefit from a more comprehensive sales programme, the selling behaviour will be consistent across the entire client base, maximising each opportunity with relevant offers – even the best sellers can’t know all their employer’s offers all the time. In addition, it eliminates the chances of selling customers products they don’t need.

Digital systems allow any offers to be made in real time, directly in response to customer action. A bank can analyse spending and saving patterns and deliver timely offers that correlate to those patterns, or even to an aberration within a pattern.

In this way, online banking will become an advisory service, rather than just a transactional operation, as the banks draw on a complete picture of their customers and access their full histories instantaneously.

Finally, the digital experience will help banks to build loyalty, offering targeted rewards directly related to recent spending patterns. For example, a customer who usually buys a Starbucks coffee every day suddenly goes to Costa for a week; the bank can send a free Starbucks coffee voucher to the customer, on Starbucks’ behalf, enticing them back. It’s a relevant, targeted reward that is likely to be taken up and engender goodwill towards the bank.

The opportunities offered by digital banking are possibly the most exciting development in banking for decades. While the mobile revolution is clouding the picture right now, it’s a cloud that really does have a silver lining.

What’s a phone anyway – the end of mobile strategies?

November 29, 2013

Since the iPhone first launched in 2006, I’ve maintained that having a mobile strategy is pointless – an opinion usually deemed either naïve, or contradictory for the sake of it. There were two reasons behind my stance: First that mobile handset technology would evolve quickly, driving constant changes in user behaviour as the increasingly powerful handsets are exploited in new ways. The second was that planning for mobile would be as ludicrous as planning for desktop, tablet, TV and other devices separately.

A third point that has come up more recently is that, while many mobile strategies have focused on phones, if you can make calls from tablets, desktops or even TVs, what is a phone anyway? Clearly the lines between devices are blurring, with smartphones the size of small tablets, tablets the size of large phones, laptops that behave like tablets, and TVs that work like PCs.

mobile strategy redundant - internet of things

As Dom Joly’s comedy sketch foreshadowed, the lines between devices are blurring

The Internet of Things

This isn’t an ‘I told you so’ post, but rather an explanation of why I think mobile strategy is becoming redundant, or is only part of a larger picture – that picture being the ‘Internet of Things’ (IOT). By now you will likely have heard about IOT, after all, it is being championed by the father of the internet, Tim Berners Lee himself. If you haven’t, then quite simply it is the concept that anything and everything, from microwaves to mousetraps, can be connected to the internet.

Driving this trend is the ever decreasing cost of computing. About ten years ago, the industry worked hard at bringing the cost of a laptop down to less than $100. Today, an Android tablet can be bought for less than $50. In fact, the cost of a chip and board that will allow you to connect to the internet has dropped to below $30 for a single unit, and below $15 for mass purchase.

Many ‘things’ can be connected

Right now, hobbyists, entrepreneurs and innovators are connecting ‘things’ to the internet. Good Night Lamp, a UK-based company, has designed a pair of lights that connect via the internet, to allow users to share their presence and availability – for example, a university student could switch on their light when home for the night, and their parent’s light would come on too to let them know their child was safe.

Mousetraps have been connected to the internet so that the owner of the trap receives an alert when the trap is set off. My personal favourite is the voice enabled / bar code scanning microwave, which scans your meal’s barcode, looks up cooking instructions on the internet, then automatically sets the cooking programme and provides voice instructions.

The next step will involve these devices talking to each other, for example, your alarm clock going off and putting on the TV, opening the curtains and turning on the lights.

mobile strategy redundant - internet of things
Good Night Lamp – one of several entrepreneurs discovering ‘things’ that can be connected to the internet

Low cost of hardware driving innovation

The low cost of the hardware is currently driving technology enthusiasts to experiment, and I believe we are in the calm before the storm. The real trigger for mass development will be non-technical people gaining the tools to build their own products and solutions, without electronics or programming knowledge.Of course, planning for a world where anything and everything is connected can incorporate a sub-strategy for mobile handsets, but planning for each device separately would evidently be counterproductive. And to prove that even the giants can get things wrong, Microsoft’s ‘three screen strategy’ (PC, phone and TV) has already been shown to be redundant.

The Digital Era is upon us

October 18, 2013

A lot has changed in technology since my last blog, and it’s only been a year! In Mobile, as expected, Android is outselling iOS, Android apps outnumber iOS apps, people are far less amazed at the size of phablets, and tablets have got both bigger and smaller. Cloud vendors continue to grow as using the cloud becomes more acceptable – as demonstrated by the Dutch authorities allowing financial services companies to use Amazon. Big Data has arrived, and companies are implementing technologies to manage, secure, and turn this data into knowledge. Social sites and technologies are now a way of life for both personal and business users. Individually, these are having a huge impact, and, combined, they will change the world around us profoundly. Technology research company Gartner calls this combination of Cloud, Mobile, Social and Big Data, ‘The Nexus of Forces’.

However, I believe there are yet more forces at hand that will combine to fundamentally transform our lives into the digital era. I’ll be covering them in more detail in future blogs, but will briefly introduce them now.

internet of things - wifi mousetrap
Finally – a digital solution to an age-old problem

The Internet of Things

One of these forces has been termed the ‘Internet of Things’, where everything from microwaves to mousetraps are being connected to the internet. We have hit price points where cost is no longer a barrier to technology, it’s only innovation and standards that are now holding us back. Within payments, innovation hasn’t been an issue, with the sector seeing lots of activity, not only in terms of technology, but also in terms of different types of payments, like Square and Pingit. However, the implementation of these solutions varies from country to country (for example, M-Pesa is huge in Africa), and there are different payment methods – such as person-to-person, or consumer-to-merchant. So, in this instance, standardisation has been the main stumbling block.End-user development (software modification by non-professional developers) is another market undercurrent, and already there are great examples where programming is being eradicated by tooling. An example of tooling is the IFTTT (if this then that) service, which allows users to visually program triggers and actions. For example, you can create a ‘recipe’, so that if you post something on Facebook it gets tweeted, or if you upload an image on Instagram it gets posted on your Facebook. This enables users to build elaborate systems, leading to easier consumption of content from a variety of sources.

Context-aware computing

A third force is context-aware computing, in which situational and environmental information is used to anticipate immediate needs, and proactively offer enriched content, functions and experiences. Gartner forecasts that by 2015, context-aware computing will affect $96 billion of annual consumer spending worldwide.

There are also many other technologies that will have an impact, such as wearable computing, gamification and augmented reality. As a technologist and gadget lover I’ve never been so overwhelmed by technology, yet we are really only at the beginning of the journey. As with the dot-com boom, innovation and new business models will change existing value chains and exploit new user behaviours – potentially, of course, leading to the emergence of a new technology bubble.

digital era christmas presents

Cost will be the only limitation to this year’s christmas present ideas

In all of this there is good and bad news, especially when it comes to Christmas. Bad news: presents are going to get much more expensive; good news: presents are going to get much more exciting!

The end of silo architectures

June 28, 2012

From my discussions with customers and prospects it is clear that the final layer in their architectures is being defined by UXP (see my previous posts). So whether you have a Service or Web Oriented architecture most organisations have already moved or are in the middle of moving towards a new flexible layered architecture that will provide more agility and breaks down the closed silo architectures they previously owned.

However solution vendors that provide “out the box” business solutions whether they be vertical (banking, insurance, pharmaceutical, retail or other) or horizontal (CRM, ERP, supply chain management) have not necessarily been as quick to open up their solutions. Whilst many will claim that they have broken out of the silo’s by “service enabling” their solution, many still have proprietary requirements to specific application servers, databases, middleware or orchestration solutions.

However recently I have come across two vendors, Temenos (global core banking) and CCS (leading insurance platform) who are breaking the mould.

CCS have developed Roundcube to be a flexible componentised solution to address the full lifecycle of insurance from product definition, policy administration to claims. Their solution is clearly layered, service enabled and uses leading 3rd party solutions to manage orchestration, integration and presentation whilst they focus on their data model and services. Their approach allows an organisation to buy into the whole integrated suite or just blend specific components into existing solutions they may have. By using leading 3rd party solutions, their architecture is open for integration into other solutions like CRM or financial ledgers.

Temenos too has an open architecture (Temenos Enterprise Framework Architecture) which allows you to use any database, application server, or integration solution. Their oData enabled interaction framework allows flexibility at the front end too.

Whilst these are both evolving solutions, they have a clear strategy and path to being more open and therefore more flexible. Both are also are providing a solution that can be scaled from the smallest business to the largest enterprises. Their solutions will therefore more naturally blend into organisations rather than dictate requirements.

Whilst packaged solutions are often enforced by business sponsors this new breed of vendor provides the flexibility that will ensure the agility of changes the business requires going forward. It’s starting to feel like organisations can “have their cake and eat it” if they make the right choices when selecting business solutions.

If you’ve seen other solutions in different verticals providing similar open architectures I would be very happy to hear about them at dharmesh@edgeipk.com.

Future of mobile: Part 3

May 13, 2012

Today I have 3 GPS devices, 4 Cameras, 3 Video cameras, 3 movie players, 5 music players and the list goes on. All of these are in a variety of devices that I use in different places for different purposes.

Drilling down into the detail what I actually have is a phone, a desktop home PC, a laptop, an iPod, a car stereo, in-car GPS, a TV+HD/DVD Player, a digital SLR, that’s just me and not including what the family has.

This presents a number of challenges, risks as well as a lot of cost…

Most of us want as little duplication of cost as possible. Already even though cars come with stereos many people are now plugging in their MP3 players, utilising the speakers in the car only. Many people will also use their phone’s GPS rather than the car’s. Newer TV’s have wireless access to browsing and social apps. I’m tempted by the hype of tablet computing, but have to ask myself, why? I have all the compute options I need?

More devices mean more synchronisation issues for personal settings and personal data. While cloud based services will resolve many of these issues, it is still early days to move everything into the cloud as users of MegaUpLoad found.

In 1999 I went to a tech show in Vegas, where I saw a potential solution to the problem from Sony. They were demonstrating the concept of “apps on sticks”. Basically these were memory sticks (max 32mb at the time) with other devices, like GPS, radio and even camera on the stick. The idea was simple you’d simply plug your GPS stick into your phone, laptop, car or any other device, rather than have that function in multiple devices. This approach would have required a lot of standardisation and clearly is a concept that never came to fruition.

More recently Asus have launched their PadFone, this is a smartphone that comes with a tablet screen. When you need to work with a bit more screen estate, you simply slot your phone into the back of the screen and hey presto you have a tablet that can use the 3G or wireless connection on your phone. Apart from being able to charge your phone, the tablet screen also integrates with the phone itself so voice and video calls can be made/received using the tablet screen.

This concept really works for me, and I could see myself buying into the family of products: TV, Car Stereo, projector. This with the ability to have my data in the cloud so losing the phone is not the end of the world, makes for a great solution. Whether the phone slots in, or connects wirelessly the ability to drive a different screen from my phone, either works for me as a concept. Maybe the idea could be taken even further so that the circuitry for the device could be slotted into the phone itself?

As I’ve discussed in my previous blogs there are many new avenues for phones, in shape, size and function. It would be difficult to predict the future with so many possibilities, but one thing for sure is that for gadget geeks like me, the phone is going to be the constant source of innovation we thrive on

Is apple Siri-ous about voice?

May 4, 2012

When I first saw the new iPhone ads that featured voice interaction all I thought was WOW, Apple have done it, they have mastered voice interaction. What appeared to be natural voice interaction is the nirvana many people have been waiting for to replace point and click interfaces.

Speech recognition is not new and certainly both Microsoft and Android had speech driven interfaces before Apple. However it was the ability to talk naturally without breaks and without having to use specific key words that seemed to set Apple apart from the competition.

Instead we were all fooled by another Jobs skill, his “reality distortion field”. Indeed one person went as far as to sue Apple for selling something that did not perform as advertised.

What exactly is the difference? Well both Windows and Android recognise specific commands and actions rather like just “talking the menu” e.g. Saying “File, Open, text.doc”. The Apple promise was that you could simply talk as you would normally speak e.g. “File, Open, text.doc” would be the same from Apple if you said “get me text.doc”.

So why aren’t we there? The challenge is creating a dictionary that can understand the synonyms and colloquialisms that people may use in conversational speech as opposed to the very specific commands used in menu’s and buttons in graphical user interfaces.

Whilst this may seem like a daunting task, I believe the first step to solve this puzzle is to reduce the problem. So rather than creating this super dictionary for absolutely any application, dictionaries should be created for specific types of applications e.g. word processing or banking. This way the focus on creating synonyms and finding colloquialisms and linking them is more manageable.

The next step would be to garner the help of the user community to build the dictionary, so that as words are identified, the user is asked what alternatives could be used so that synonyms/ colloquialisms are captured.

I know this is not a detailed specification but this is an approach that Apple might use to give us what they promised – and what the world is waiting for… speech driven user interfaces.

Is the growth of Mobile Apps overhyped?

March 22, 2012

There are numerous statistics on the growth of mobile apps in the various stores, and also about the number of downloads. Apple claims over 500,000 apps in its store and Google claims over 450,000 (this time last year it had only 150,000). The number of apps, downloads and rate of growth is phenomenal.

Is this just a temporary fever or will this growth continue, and if so what will drive it?

I believe this growth has only just started and that there are two key trends that will drive this growth further.

Firstly, development for smartphones will get simpler. VisionMobile’s latest survey profiles over a hundred development tools for creating mobile apps. My guess is that is a very conservative estimate of the actual number of tools out there.

A common goal for many of these providers is to make programming simpler so that more people can code. For some, this goes further, to the extent that tools are being created for children to develop apps at school. So more developers will mean more apps!

Secondly and this for me is the more exciting aspect, is that phones will do more, which means that apps will get more innovative.

Today there are a wide variety of apps already, some of which use features of the phone itself like the camera, GPS or microphone. Coming down the line are many more features that will get embedded into phones, for example the ability to detect a user emotions and the ability to monitor a users health. Such features will drive yet more applications and innovations from personal healthcare to fraud detection.

Apart from new features, phones will start interact with other devices such as your TV. At a simple level, your smartphone can be already be used as a remote control for your TV or to join in with live TV quiz shows. Already phones are interacting with cars, and this integration will inevitably go further, so that your engine management system feeds your phone with data that an app can use.

Recent surveys from recruitment agencies highlight the growing demand for mobile developers, and more interestingly the re-skilling of developers to position themselves for this growth.

Exciting times are ahead for developers and entrepreneurs who will show that Angry Birds isn’t the only way to make big money in mobile.

Mobile Apps: When to go native

March 15, 2012

Let me say from the outset, that there is no right answer for everybody. The battle between cross-platform solutions and native mobile applications is going to continue for years to come; I know I have blogged about this before, and probably will again.

For many corporate applications, native code offers the marketing group richer customer experiences, the business the chance to innovate solutions using device-specific solutions, and IT some new development tools.

However, if an organisation has to support the widest range of phones possible, the development of native apps becomes cumbersome, since you then need to write apps for each of the major mobile platforms available.

Part of this decision depends on whether you decide to support older phones, i.e. non-smartphones. For non-smartphone support you’ll need to build in support for features from SMS text services to basic text browsers.

Typically this is aimed at operating in developing countries. In developed countries like the UK, the growth of smartphones means that there is now a critical mass of users crowding out lower-featured handsets.

If you decide to target smartphones, then you still have a choice. You can either:

  1. Build for each platform, using it’s own development tools
  2. Use a cross platform mobile development solution, or
  3. Write your app as a browser solution.

So how does an organisation decide which way to go?

I found this useful little questionnaire developed by InfoTech. It takes you through a set of questions about your needs, and then suggests the best way forward between a native solution and a web-based solution.

As a quick guide to review a specific tactical requirement, I thought it was pretty good and asked very pertinent questions. Obviously this is something that an IT department could expand or specialise for their own needs, and so provides a useful structured approach to making impartial decisions without any emotional bias.

Where support for multiple platforms is crucial, a more difficult decision will be whether to use a cross-platform mobile development solution or to go for a pure web (and possibly HTML5) solution.

I’ll discuss this issue in a future blog, but for the time being, check out the questionnaire to start thinking about your mobile approach.

Future of mobile phones (part 2)

March 8, 2012

Previously we looked at the form factor, what shape phones could be in the future. But what will phones do?

Clearly phones are getting smarter and able to do more, so here are some thoughts on the changes that could occur.

Phones replace your laptop/PC

Sometime this year we should see phones with quad-core processors, making them as powerful as some PCs. Following Moore’s law, they will get more and more powerful. And the same goes for storage/memory, although as “cloud applications” improve you will need less on your device.

With this in mind, you could easily see a phone that slips into the back of a tablet which is only a screen. Already, the Motorola Atrix shows that you can have a dockable phone that could replace the need for a PC.

Phones replace your wallet

This one’s not really news at all. Already there are a whole lot of mobile cash/payment solutions, so I won’t go further into this just now. However with NFC (near field communication) expect to be able to pay for things simply by tapping your phone on a till or another phone (e.g. to give your friends money).

Phones replace your keys

Again, NFC could quite easily be used to allow your phones to open car doors, your front door at home and even replace security badges at work. It might be that phones will have multiple slots for NFC chips.

Phones replace your brain

Not literally, but they will save you having to remember things. Growth in memory capacity means that you could have chips that store everything: what you see, say, hear and do. Coupled with powerful search capability you’ll never forget people that you met, actions from meetings and the name of the little restaurant you loved on holiday.

Phones replace your doctor, mechanic…

Google has toyed with the concept of phones with monitoring capability, immediately alerting you of heart, blood pressure and maybe even sugar level issues. Ford have toyed with phones alerting you of servicing needs in a car and other advanced telemetry. Following on from this, there’s no reason why your phone won’t become your central processing unit for anything: your home security, your gas boiler servicing and more. Expect a future where there is a lot more device to device interaction than today (I will write more about this soon).

Phones replace your personal assistant

Already there are apps to help you with everything from planning your train journey to scheduling parties. In the future, your phone will also tell you when you’re close to shops you like or that have offers on things you might like based on your personal tastes.

You may be on holiday, and your phone will let you know where the nearest bathrooms are or how to navigate through a city to make sure you see all sites of interest with the most efficient route possible.

So with all these capabilities phones could be very important. How will be secure something that can so easily be lost? It could be that they move towards biometric security: voice, fingerprint or facial recognition. Or it could be that a secondary NFC chip that is in some jewellery or even embedded inside you grants you access.

This all sounds very futuristic, but some of the features discussed are either already here, or could be within the next five years. It seems phones are going to be part of an important and exciting future for us all.

Future of the mobile phone (part 1)

March 1, 2012

For a few months now I’ve been having conversations with colleagues, friends and family about the future of phones, sad I know but at heart I am still a geek ;o).

I see three possible futures for mobile form factors. Phablets, smartphones, phone jewellery (starting with watches and bracelets, then other jewellery).

The smartphone we all know and love. Multi-functional it is technologists answer to the swiss army knife. This is currently the most popular form and for many will continue for years to come. However, the downside to this is that screen estate is limited and the need to zoom and scroll detracts from any serious browsing.

This has brought an opportunity to try a new form factor, the “Phablet” (phone-tablet), a phone that is not as big as a tablet, but not as small as a phone. The Galaxy Note is a good example, with a 5.3 inch screen it’s a little big for a phone, and perhaps too small to be called a tablet.

What’s interesting though is that the screen resolution (1280×800) matches most current tablets, and is better than many of the earlier tablets, so what you get on the screen is the same amount of information as a tablet. This for some will solve the problem of having to carry a phone AND a tablet.

However for some people a phone needs to be a phone and nothing more. For my wife, for instance, ideally this would be not much bigger than the size of a lipstick and just as simple to use. Phone size and weight can place a burden in pockets so going smaller also makes sense. In addition to that there mobility makes them easier to lose, which can be a real issue for most people.

There are already phones in watches, and there are some great prototypes of bracelet style watches. As batteries improve I can see phones being embedded into other jewellery also such as pendants or earings. This is approach is great from a security perspective as people tend to lose more phones than their watch or bracelet, and with mobile payments this may become an important factor.

The smartphone itself may yet bite back, there have already been concepts of smartphones with projectors and ones with roll-out screens that solve the issue of screen estate. Other concepts include “flexible phones”, phones that are so thin that they can flex. In fact Nokia has taken this further so that the phone has “flex-gestures” for example bending the phone up or down scrolls pages.

Or will we become phones ourselves? Will we have bionic implants?

So what do you think? Will you wear you phone, carry it or will you be a phone?