Posts Tagged ‘mobile applications’

HTML5 The proprietary standard

October 16, 2011

The good thing about standards is that they are uniform across different vendor implementation. Well that is at least the primary goal. So how does a vendor make a standard proprietary?

Well it’s quite easy really you provide extensions to the standard for features that are not yet implemented in the standard. Vendors wouldn’t be that unscrupulous would they? For example would they create application servers following standards but add their own extensions to “hook you in”, sorry I mean to add value beyond what the standards provide ;o)

I’m sure Microsoft’s announcement at Build to allow developers to create Windows 8 Metro applications using HTML5 and Javascript took many Microsoft developers by surprise. What is Microsoft’s game plan with this?

Optimists will cry that it opens Metro development out to the wider base of web developers rather than just to the closed Microsoft community. Cynic’s will argue that it is an evil ploy for Microsoft to play the open card whilst actually hooking you into their proprietary OS. In the cynics corner a good example is Microsoft’s defiant stance of Direct3D versus the open standard alternative OpenGL. This has lead to Google developing Angle, effectively allowing OpenGL calls to be translated into Direct3D ones so that the same programmes can be run on Microsoft platforms.

Whatever it is developers aiming for cross platform conformance will need to stay sharp to ensure that proprietary extensions do not make the application incompatible in different environments.

Adobe’s recent donation of CSS Shaders shows a more charitable approach whereby extensions are donated back to the standards bodies to make the “value added” features available to every platform. This is largely the approach in which standards evolve, with independent committee’s validating vendor contributions.

So what is Microsoft’s game? It’s too early to really say whether there is an altruistic angle on their support for HTML5 and JS, but history has shown us that the empire is not afraid to strike back. Look at their collaboration with IBM on OS/2 leading them to leave IBM in lurch with their own launch of Windows NT. A similar approach occurred not long after with with Sybase and Sql Server.

I maybe a cynic, but having been a Windows developer from Windows 1.0 to Windows NT and following a road of promises and U turns has made me that way when it comes to Microsoft. It’s great to see increasing support for HTML5 but I am always a little concerned with the motivations of the Redmond camp. However perhaps I myself need to be “open” to a different Microsoft, one that is embracing standards even though it may cannibalize it’s own Silverlight technology.

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HTML5 gets fun, without a plug-in in sight

June 16, 2011

I’ve still not finished covering all the new features of HTML5, but I do think it’s time for a bit of a break. One of the real measures of whether HTML5 will take off will be how well it will support the gaming industry, and indeed here some people have feared that it will not deliver and have continued to back plug-in based technologies like Flash, Java or Silverlight. Well after extensive research it’s time to dispel a few myths
.
Now it’s not true that there haven’t been some great HTML games already, remember Google’s re-incarnation of PacMan and recently Effect Game’s Crystal Galaxy which will work even in IE6 !

However a number of features like Canvas, HTML5 Audio and WebWorkers are changing people’s perception of what is possible on the web and all without plug-ins ! So here is my top 5.

In at number 5 is, well not a game, but nevertheless a nice use of the new canvas API’s, a remake of the popular windows desktop app, Paintbrush.

At number 4 is another remake of an old classic, Asteroids! Whilst not up to the standard of today’s modern graphics they are a vast improvement over the games original line art graphics, and offers smooth movement and responsive feedback.

Number 3 is Canvas Rider a simple yet strangely addictive game requiring skill and judgement to guide a motorcyclist across a number of different scenes.

Just missing the top spot is Torus a 3D cylindrical version of Tetris.

However in first place has to be Pixel Lab’s Agent 8 Ball, great graphics, fast smooth operation and sound make it hard to believe that this is a browser game without any plug-in support. In fact this video comparison of Flash vs HTML seems to have totally missed this great example too (see comparison of pool game 3mins in). There are many more great examples out there, even for those Silverlight enthusiasts Microsoft has assembled some great examples of HTML5 in action.

So what’s the future?  Well if Google’s demo last year of it’s web version of Quake is anything to go by things are certainly looking exciting ! The future is definitely not solo game play, as Game Closure showed last month when it demo’d a multiplay social game called Popstar Defense.

All the credit for this new world of possibility can’t just go to HTML5/Javascript as technologies because it is the tremendous improvements in Javascript engines by all the main stream browser providers that is giving the games a useful performance boost.
I’ll be covering some of the HTML5 features that enable these games such as Canvas and HTML5 Audio in future posts, enough research for now…  time to get back to work !

Make sure you use a current browser supporting HTML5 features like Canvas to view / play these.

http://www.google.com/pacman/
http://www.effectgames.com/effect/games/crystalgalaxy/
http://mugtug.com/sketchpad/
http://www.kevs3d.co.uk/dev/asteroids/
http://canvasrider.com/
http://www.benjoffe.com/code/games/torus/
http://agent8ball.com

http://www.beautyoftheweb.com/

HTML5 gets very chatty

May 26, 2011

The web started birth with very much a “click and wait” experience. Any interaction with the server meant a round trip of data across a slow line and ended up with a page refresh. In the Web 2.0 era things changed dramatically with the exploitation of an API: XMLHttpRequest the foundation of a framework called Ajax. With Ajax web pages could now interact with the server without page refreshes. This was transformational, and especially as bandwidth speeds increased people got very inventive with Ajax and created applications that started to feel much more like desktop applications.

Whilst this created a massive step forward developers were still having to create proprietary approaches, sometimes using plugins, for other forms of communications with the server. Ajax allowed the client to call the server, what about the other way round? And further still how about a server sending a message to multiple clients – either on the same machine but in different windows or indeed to multiple physical clients?

Step forward HTML5 which brings a number of new capabilities for communication. There are plenty of resources that provide tutorials on how to use these new features, the focus of this blog is just to raise awareness of the features and the possibilities they present.

Cross Domain Messaging is one of my favourite features of HTML5 and worthy of it’s own separate article, which I will do in my next post. Essentially Cross Domain Messaging allows you to send messages between separate applications running in separate iFrames, Tabs or even browser windows. It is facilitated by the existing PostMessage api (see next post for more details).

XMLHttpRequest has also been upgraded to support Cross Document Messaging. This now means that an application can communicate with multiple servers. For example imajine a News page that contains an article about Japan, the page may have separate sections containing local weather and currency rate updates. Previously the page would have been built up with content from different sites at the server end, now it is possible to do this from the client. A further enhancement to XMLHttpRequest is the addition of Progress Events. Previously when a request was made to the server there was only the “readstatechange” event, which was limited and no implemented consistently across browsers. Now there are several more meaningful and useful events (loadstart, progress, abort, error, load, loadend) that can be processed

Another constraint the web has faced has been the ability for servers to send messages to clients. The most common example being stock markets feeds. Typically developers have created a polling mechanism to get updates from the server at regular intervals most likely using XMLHttpRequest. This creates unnecessary load and traffic to the server. HTML5 also introduces the concept of Server Sent messages using the EventSource interface.  This is basically a publish and subscribe approach: the client subscribes to a message event source, and the server code publishes messages to those subscribers.

XMLHttpRequest and Server Sent Messages are uni-directional messages, but what if you need bi-directional messages: the ability for either the client or server to send/recieve messages? Well HTML5 also has an answer for that with WebSockets (note it is possible to achieve bi-directional messaging without WebSockets, but it is much more difficult, unreliable and network inefficient)

WebSockets is a large topic, however the key point to be made here is that it is a more efficient and standard mechanism for enabling bi-directional messaging. The first step in the process is establishing a handshake between the client and server, this is done by upgrading from http protocol to the websocket protocol. Where websocket communication provides a significant advantage is that once the handshake is established, communication between client and server is free from the heavy load of http headers! Http headers can reach 2k in size, which is a massive overhead if the message is only 10 bytes.

When you compare this to applications that have implemented a polling approach you can see that WebSockets are not only more efficient in message size but can significantly reduce unnecessary traffic created by polling and reduce latency of updates (created by the polling time).

Using WebSockets today does require a server of which there are many available, and of course like all HTML5 features browser support varies and hence needs to be checked.

This post aimed to key you a flavour of some of the key new features that enable web applications to become more chatty and in doing so not only make applications faster, efficient but richer and more dynamic than we have been used to. I believe just these features alone could drive a new generation of web applications across many industries like gaming and financial services. Could this be Web 4.0 ?

 http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/comms.html#comms

HTML5 knows where you are!

May 12, 2011

A few years back I was deemed a heretic by many of my colleagues and friends  when I suggested that HTML5 will remove the need for writing many mobile applications. I was pummelled with questions like:

  • But how will they work offline?
  • Are you saying a browser user experience can rival a platform native one like Apples?
  • You do realise that most games require “threading” how you going to do that?
  • What about storing data locally, can you do that?

I was able to fend of most of these, but the one I couldn’t at the time was about accessing the device applications like Camera and GPS. Well things have moved on and whilst I am no longer deemed a heretic there are still some corridor’s whispering doubt.

One of the big features of mobile technology used by many apps is the phones location and location based services and application have already been through a huge hype cycle.

Under the catch-all banner of HTML5, although it is a separate subspec, the W3C Geo Location working group are making location based applications a reality for web developers. It has been around a while and hence is fairly mature and stable now.

A device (even a desktop) can provide location information in a number of ways:

  • IP Address (this is typically the location of the ISP rather than your machine, but ok if you simply want to check which country the user is in)
  • Cell Phone triangulation (only fairly accurate, very dependent on the phone signal so could be problematic in the countryside or inside buildings)
  • GPS (very accurate, takes longer to get location, dependant on hardware support and can be unreliable inside buildings)

Location data can also be simply user defined: however this is dependent on the user entering accurate information.

Of course one of the key concerns will be privacy but the spec covers this with an approach that the requires a user to give permission for location information to be passed to an application. Note the application can only access location information through the browser and not directly e.g. from the GPS device. Hence the browser enforces the user permissions for access.

The Geo Location API allow for both one off request to get the users current location or for repeated updates on the user’s position, developers write simple callback routines for both approaches. The key information provided includes: latitude, longitude and accuracy. Accuracy is a %value of how close the longitude and latitude values are to the user. Depending on the device you may also get additional information such and speed, heading (direction of travel) and altitude.

As per any quality application you process errors accordingly, especially responding to a failure to get hold of location data because of signal issues or other reasons. Hence retrieving location information is fairly simple, the real hardwork is in processing that information and that requires good old fashioned quality programming ;o)

This specification presents a huge opportunity for web developers to create applications once deemed only the domain of platform specific code, and I for one am very excited !

http://dev.w3.org/geo/api/spec-source.html

HTML5 takes on the cloud.

April 28, 2011

Thanks to Microsoft not only do I have to fix my friends and family PC (well actually Windows) issues, but they now keep asking me about the cloud. So in retaliation I’m going to write about the total opposite: how you can get web applications to run offline using HTML5.

There have been a number of open and proprietary technologies that have allowed applications to be delivered and updated through the web but to operate locally. Some of these have been dependant on plug-ins e.g. flash, Silverlight or platform specific such as Microsoft HTA.

HTML5 now brings with it features that not only allow you to run applications offline but also to store data and content with it too. Of course you may be thinking with 3G, 4G and Wifi we have ubiquitous broadband anytime anywhere, but you only have to take a stroll out of the city to realise we are not quite there.  In fact the success of mobile apps has highlighted the need for local offline applications.

First an application can check whether it is online or offline by checking the navigator.online property (it is a simple Boolean). There are also events to notify an application of a change in status so an application can behave as desired in either it’s online or offline state.

HTML5 allows you to define a “Manifest” , essentially this simply lists the files (pages, images, scripts etc…) an application wants the browser to store (cache) locally so that they can be read when offline. There are also events and processing that can be programmed to control how and when the cached pages are refreshed, this includes the ability to show progress bars whilst a large application is being downloaded to the cache.

There aren’t many applications that don’t rely on stored data. HTML5 WebStorage specification provides new API’s for persisting data as simple key value pairs. There are two options here: sessionStorage or localStorage. The key difference between the two is how long the data is kept for. Simply, if your application just needs data whilst it is currently running (and not after the browser is closed) then use sessionStorage , otherwise if your application needs data that can be used after browser re-starts use localStorage. Although this sounds similar to cookies, these API’s are far more efficient and can store far more data than cookies. Both options provide getItem, setItem and removeItem methods for retrieving, storing and removing values. There are also events that can be trapped and processed by an application when data changes. For me the WebStorage specification is one of the most exciting as I have previously blogged the need for “client side session management” to improve performance and efficiency of web applications.

In many applications this simple storage of data will not be enough and users will want much more the capabilities of a database that can be queried and sorted. Here the IndexDB specification comes to the rescue. This specification deserves a blog post in it’s own right, so for now I’m going to leave it as HTML5’s answer to having a local database capability.

So HTML5 brings a host of features to make rich, dynamic applications with local storage work offline a reality. But we are still a way off from this being a ubiquitous solution as standards/specifications gets finalised and desktop browser’s play catchup with enabling these new features. However the time is right for your organisations to re-evaluate the technologies  used for offline applications as HTML5 is a serious contender for the future that is inevitably going to require a cross platform approach to both online and offline.

http://www.w3.org/TR/IndexedDB/

http://dev.w3.org/html5/webstorage/

http://www.w3.org/TR/2011/WD-html5-20110113/offline.html#offline

HTML5 What’s in it?

April 21, 2011

In my blog about HTML5 confusion I never really answered the question on everyone’s lips “Exactly what is in HTML5 ?”. And guess what I’m going to skip the issue again and just follow the categorisation of features as per the W3C as they have very pretty logo’s for each category and mainly because it’s important to know what can be done with HTML5.

The W3C have identified 8 categories of new functionality / capabilities offered by ” HTML5” which can be found here, they are:

Semantics
Create “smarter” documents for users and machine readers
RDFa, Microdata, Microformats, richer semantics/structure

Offline and & Storage
Ability for web applications to store data locally and run offline.
Application caching, session and local storage, Indexed DB

Device Access
Allow applications to access device features such as GPS
Geolocation API, more to follow including gesture events

Connectivity
More/better communication options between server & browser
Websockets, Server pushed messages, Cross document msgs

Multimedia
Add and control sound and video on your sites
Audio/Video elemts and API’s

Graphics and Effects
Draw and animate 2/3D rich graphics
SVG, Canvas, WebGL, CSS 3D

Performance & Integration
Asynchronous communication and processing
WebWorkers (threading in browser), XMLHttpRequest L2

CSS3
Improved styles, transforms, effects and fonts
CSS3, WebFonts (Web Open Fonts Format – WOFF)

Whilst the graphics and simple descriptions are quite cool what concerns me is again the ambiguity:

  • HTML5 is more than HTML (its CSS as well, but what about Javascript?)
  • XMLHttpRequest is performance and integration whereas it is actually this feature that created “web 2.0” by enabling asynchronous communication between browser and server, the cornerstone of Ajax.
  • In the categories above where does the Forms validation improvements fit in? (probably in semantics, but I feel this should have it’s own category)

There’s clearly a tremendous amount of really excellent work going into HTML5, it has sound principles and gaining strong momentum – especially in the mobile world. However this has to be balanced with the fact there is still lots of work to do, ambiguities to be ironed out and getting all involved parties and bystanders to sing off the same hym sheet should all not be underestimated.

The finalisation of the specification (when it becomes “candidate recommendation”) is expected sometime in 2012 by the spec’s main editor, Google’s Ian Hickson. However to be a W3C Recommendation status requires “two 100% complete and fully interoperable implementations” and this Hickson believes will happen around 2022 or even later.

However the bandwagon and gravy-train for HTML5 has already started rolling and is gaining momentum, I would say only the foolish will not hop on board. IMHO it is only a matter of when not IF for HTML5. Question is what will you do?

http://www.w3.org/html/logo/

HTML5 prepare for specification spaghetti?

April 14, 2011

For those that have been tracking HTML5 for a while I’m sure life is crystal clear, for those that have not well lets just say you may need some help navigating your way through over 900 pages of documentation which is duplicated by two separate standards organisation and further confused by media journalists and industry analysts.

First a quick step back into history: 1991 Tim Berners Lee publishes “HTML Tags” basically the first publication documenting HTML. However it was not until 1995 with the publication HTML 2.0 that a standard was born by a working group in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Fast forward again and W3C took over HTML in 1996 but it was not until 2000 HTML became an international standard (ISO/IEC 15445:2000). In 1999 the W3C issued HTML 4.01.

In 2004 a working group consisting of individuals Apple, Opera and Mozilla formed the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG) to look at the evolution of HTML. The WHATWG believed that much more evolution was required and their views were in contrast to what the W3C was doing with Xforms in 2003. The WHATWG set out on their own to define HTML’s destiny. However in 2006 the W3C took an interest in participating in their work and both groups have been working together since.

Simple right? So they are both working together on HTML5 specification and are going to publish a spec soon? The answer to this question is not so easy, so we have to break up the question.

Yes they are both working together. However the specification(s) being worked on by the WHATWG cover broader technical ground than the specification for HTML5 being proposed by the W3C (e.g. Canvas 2D, Microdata, Cross document messaging). In addition to this the HTML specification developed by the WHATWG is a subset of their “Web Application” specification which covers additional topics (e.g. WebWorkers, WebStorage, WebSockets…).

Essentially the W3C have divided out some of the work that the WHATWG are doing as separate specifications/standards. The good news is that we are told they are both working from the same source. The relationship of the various documents are neatly summarised in the FAQ’s of the WHATWG website (see link below).

All clear now? At the start of this article I alluded to other parties adding to the confusion, mainly the Press and Analysts. Some of this stems from the various sub specs created by the WHATWG and W3C, but also by the grouping of the evolution of other separate but related technologies like CSS and Javascript. In an attempt to help their clients clarify the situation technology analyst Gartner describes this superset of standards with the catch-all term “Modern Web Technologies”, however I am yet to find a single definition of all the standards their terminology encompasses.

As I sifted through sites and wiki’s everything was going so well until the W3C launched their HTML 5 logo programme saying that it was for : “general-purpose visual identity for a broad set of open web technologies, including HTML5,CSS, SVG, WOFF, and others”… doh ! Back to the drawing board then.

Oh well ignoring all that noise, there’s only the small matter of reading through over 900 pages of specification(s) .

http://www.w3.org/TR/2011/WD-html5-20110113/

http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/complete.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML_5

http://wiki.whatwg.org/wiki/FAQ#What_are_the_various_versions_of_the_spec.3F

Does HTML5 mean the end of Silverlight: Yes

March 31, 2011

If you’re like me, you might have a dream that surfers will soon not have to rely on plug-ins to enjoy browsing the web. For fellow dreamers, the forthcoming and latest round of browser wars might lead to a better web experience rather than yet another plug-in based nightmare.

Microsoft has recently had to grin and bear the pain, while its dominant Explorer browser has seen its market share attacked by a series of platforms, including Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari – and most notably – Google Chrome. With market share now hovering at round 60% (see further reading, below), it’s almost as if the top guys at Redmond have suggested that enough is enough.

The result is a return of the browser wars, with Microsoft set to preview the final beta of Internet Explorer 9 (IE9) in September. Chrome is clean, simple and fast – and expectations will be that IE9 provides a much quicker browsing experience.

Initial signs look good. Graphics performance is enhanced and hardware is accelerated. But the real story is the heavy use of HTML5, showing that researchers in Redmond also feel the next generation mark-up language is the best way forward for development.

“The future of the web is HTML5,” suggested Dean Hachamovitch, the general manager for Internet Explorer in a blog post earlier this year (see further reading). With Apple and Google also throwing their weight behind HTML5, much debate has rightly centred on the tricky situation facing Adobe’s video plug-in Flash.

But Microsoft’s support for HTML5 potentially creates another set of circumstances and another high profile conflict. This conflict surrounds Silverlight, a web framework that integrates multimedia and graphical elements in a single environment.

More intriguingly, it is Microsoft’s own framework – and, since April 2007, it has formed the backbone of the provider’s presentation framework. So, where does Microsoft’s support for HTML5 leave Silverlight? That, for web developers, is the key question.

Online publication The Register recently referred to the clash as “The Silverlight Paradox”, suggesting that a high quality and HTML5-ready IE9 will surely make many of the features of Silverlight and Flash redundant (see further reading).

Such a paradox, however, is fraught with complications. IE9 might look like it provides new fuel for Microsoft’s browser battle, but the true level of optimisation will not be clear until web developers get their hands on beta.

As The Register article suggests, legacy requirements mean the use of plug-ins will persist for many years – even if IE9 delivers everything it promises. But the move towards HTML5 shows that the captive strength of plug-ins is waning and businesses must develop web platforms with capability across all levels, from the desktop through to the mobile. The new web experience is emerging.

Further reading:

http://arstechnica.com/microsoft/news/2010/03/firefox-may-never-hit-25-percent-market-share.ars

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ie/archive/2010/04/29/html5-video.aspx

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/08/05/inside_ie9/

Does HTML5 mean the end of the road for Gears, HTA and Flash?

March 10, 2011

Web standard HTML5 contains loads of great features, from video playback to drag-and-drop. But the best bit, and currently one of the least talked about elements, might be the capability to run apps offline.

The normal web experience is hindered by connectivity. Users can typically access web apps while they have a connection to the internet. Once offline, individuals lose access to email, calendar or notes. There are, of course, workarounds. Google Gears, for example, allows users to navigate compatible sites offline and synchronise when back online.

Microsoft HTML Applications (HTA), meanwhile, is a Microsoft Windows formalisation that provides a web-like experience offline. And Adobe Flash can also be run offline, allowing users to run Flash-based content.

Such workarounds are OK but they are also a bit messy. People want the same experience online or offline; they want to get hold of – and manipulate content – regardless of location and they don’t want to be hindered by platform specific technologies or plug-ins.

HTML5 provides that standardisation. Its two–pronged approach re-connects the user through an SQL-based interface for storing data locally, and an offline cache that helps ensure apps are always available (see further reading, below).

With regards to availability, HTML5’s application cache mechanism provides the ability to have a fall back page for rendering pages when offline. It also provides a means to update cache dynamically. The key, here, is client-side management.

And without wanting to bang my own drum too loudly, it is a rhythm I have been hinting at for a long, long time. I blogged two years ago (see further reading) about client-side management as a method for keeping data in the browser, rather than the server, and as means to reducing memory and processing requirements.

“If only it was supported as standard by the browser rather than having to use hidden fields,” I concluded – and now that day is fast approaching. HTML5 creates a standards-based method for creating local apps that run offline.

As mentioned earlier, HTML5 also provides the ability to store data locally through a client-side SQL database. A series of apps could potentially work with this database, providing a new level of accessibility and integration.

The total approach represents a huge step forwards for web development. It also signals that the end is nigh for proprietary workarounds like Gears, HTA and Flash. HTML5 is the future and web developers simply must get with the program.

Further reading:

http://www.w3.org/TR/offline-webapps/

http://blogs.computerworlduk.com/facing-up-to-it/2008/07/client-side-session-management/index.htm

Chameleon Web Sites: Write once Publish Many

February 24, 2011

Unless you’re a genius, you don’t always have the best ideas. And unless you work for an incredible all-rounder, your organisation won’t always have the best products and services.

That is why it sometimes makes sense to reach out and work with trusted partners. And the ever-complex world of IT – where technologies, processes and requirements change quicker than elsewhere in business – is likely to be where business executives look for the most external assistance.

Your firm wouldn’t trust someone else to manage its finances and it’s unlikely they’d externalise human resources, bar the odd use of a recruitment consultant or two. But IT provides tremendous options to outsource, offshore and externalise.

White-labelling, where a company takes a  product and wraps a brand around it, allows a company to sell products they didn’t actually make/manufacture. This has been done for years with hard products and is now becoming much make popular online too.  This approach allows a company to sell products as if they actually created the site – and while that sounds a bit deceptive, it’s actually becoming common practice.

In the case of financial services firms, white-labelling is a huge area of IT business growth. It has been for a while; allowing businesses to create systems without risks and that look good and work well.

In fact, white-labelling is so ingrained that analyst Gartner recognises that specialist providers often re-brand software as their own to help complete financial software suites. That extended approach is beginning to filter down to customers, too.

Finance firms have typically taken an application and changed small elements, such as fonts, colours, images and contact numbers (basic look and feel). However, the embedded nature of business technology, and the prevalence of social media, means that users are demanding a much more hands-on approach from white-labelled software.

Brand owners are determined to deal with such intuitive requirements and are asking for more control over the customer experience. This results in a request for systems that reflect the brand, rather than the product owners, and which allow control over pagination and layout to produce a unique look and feel.

Unfortunately the future is getting more complex for whitelabellers as their brands will demand support not only for their very own customer experience, but will demand it across a range of device types (mobile, TV, etc) too!

Organisations need technology from partners that will be able work the ever-increasing demands for flexibility. Without a supple approach to white-labelling, the IT organisation will be left with a huge amount of underlying bespoke code that will need to updated in-line with every product or service change.

While you might not be an all-round mastermind, it doesn’t take a genius to work out that a flexible approach to white-labelling is essential for your business.

Further reading:

http://www.gartner.com/DisplayDocument?id=1451737