Posts Tagged ‘collaboration’

What’s a UXP

March 29, 2012

Gartner are defining a category they call UXP to help organisations manage all their user experience requirements.

Gartner defines the UXP as “an integrated collection of technologies and methodologies that provides the ability to design and deliver user interface/presentation capabilities for a wide variety of interaction channels (including features such as web, portal, mashup, content management, collaboration, social computing, mobile, analytics, search, context, rich Internet application, e-commerce, an application platform and an overall user experience design and management framework)”.

There is currently no precise definition of the set of technologies a UXP encompasses, but Gartner identify the following list as candidates:

  • Web analytics
  • Search
  • Social
  • Programming frameworks and APIs
  • UX design and management
  • Rich internet applications
  • E-commerce
  • Mobile
  • Content management
  • Collaboration, with portal and mashups being core.

With growing importance of web interfaces on all devices the UXP is not a moment too soon, as organisations need to get a grip of not just these technologies, but the underlying supporting business processes and skills they require to define, create, manage and measure their user and customer experiences.

It’s clear that from an architectural perspective the UXP covers everything that is in the “Presentation layer”, and maybe a few that are in the grey areas between the Presentation layer and the Business layer.

As Gartner have identified, this is a growing list of technologies. From my perspective, some of these need to be integrated and some are standalone, and it would be helpful to have some broader categories within the UXP to help focus efforts towards implementation.

Social and collaboration technologies facilitate interaction between two or more users, and so could be grouped into a category called UXP-Collaboration.

Content is the core of any web platform and content management, search and analytics could be grouped into a category called UXP-Content.

Portal, mobile apps, RIA and mashups are essentially application development technologies so could be group as UXP-Apps.

From a process perspective these categories also make sense, as UX-Collaboration technologies are installed and then require mediation processes to manage the implementation, while UX-Content require publishing and monitoring lifecycle and UX-Apps technologies are implemented by IT, and go through an IT development lifecycle.

However, UXP is an evolving field, and as with any technology it is clear that selection and implementation cannot be done without a full understanding of business requirements, the underlying implementation and management processes and skills required.

Given the size, complexity and importance of this task I would not be surprised to see some organisations appoint a Chief eXperience Officer (CXO).

Think online and offline to avoid getting stuck in the clouds

October 20, 2008

The Telegraph Media Group (TMG) recently announced it is not refreshing its current Microsoft Office, Exchange and Windows XP deployment and is instead moving about 1,400 internal users to cloud-based service Google Apps.

TMG’s decision to move into cloud computing – where IT-related capabilities are provided using internet technologies – could be indicative of a sea change.

More IT managers are considering a similar transition to desktop provision through the cloud, where employees can access applications and information through internet-enabled devices. For IT managers looking to the cloud, is there any major difference between online and offline provision?

The key benefits of an off-the-shelf package are well-rehearsed. Most employees will have spent most of their working lives adapting or using standard Microsoft Office packages.

Standardisation promotes usability, with workers able to benefit from working with an accepted format for spreadsheets or written documents. Such usability has helped cement Microsoft’s desktop dominance – until now.

Where as IT managers would previously have shied away from change, most now realise that best value requires an innovative and transformative approach.

Google Apps, for example, encourages collaboration. Users are able to benefit from a broad suite of applications, sharing and creating knowledge documents attached in Google Mail.

Cost is also an important factor. The Premier Edition of Google’s desktop service offers low-cost licensing and technical support, with bugs fixed and patches updated automatically.

Problems associated to storage are also removed, as information is stored in the cloud, rather than on a firm’s own resource-hungry servers.

But such a method can bring security concerns. Storing information centrally means IT managers need to be aware of potential dangers and ensure workers are trained.

And while TMG’s move into the cloud shows a leading-edge stance, mass adoption will rely on providers – such as Google – ensuring online applications have a familiar feel and high-specification functionality.

Working in the cloud also means users will need 24/7 access to the internet. Look for a provider that can match your demands, allowing workers to use cloud-based tools offline – because a drop in service availability can have damaging effects on productivity.

While the world gets carried away with rich internet experiences through Ajax and Web 2.0, users must remember the browser also serves a meaningful life offline – as well as online.

Google’s approach shows how businesses can create applications, whether workers are connected or disconnected – which has to a useful trick in helping your firm to stay ahead of the game.

And moving from the tried-and-trusted into the clouds should be all about increasing efficiency.


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