HTML5: The right time right place for mobile?


Most people by now understand that main challenge for developing mobile applications is creating a solution that runs on as many platforms as possible. This challenge can range from supporting browsers that only support text, up to fully fledged smartphones.

For organisations that are targeting users in the developed world, many are simplifying this challenge to target smartphones only. However even here to create local native applications requires solutions that support Apple’s iOS, Windows, Android and Java (Blackberry).

There are many mobile development platforms available to assist with creating “write once deploy everywhere” apps. The main constrains here are that you end up with deployments to many different stores, and that quite often still write platform specific code to take advantage of platform specific features.

HTML5 has long been a strong candidate for mobile applications, but is it ready? Are mobile browsers upto date with HTML5?

The answer to this question can be a simple “No”, no mobile browser supports the full HTML5 specification. Or a “Maybe” depending on what features (camera, phone book and GPS) of the phone you require you may have support from HTML5.

Push that up to a resounding “Yes”, if you want to move an application that currently runs on the web to run on mobile. Of course, I should also caveat the above with ‘there are grey areas’ in between these responses, not very helpful I know.

For corporates looking to support mobile users with line of business applications I believe there are some great examples that prove HTML5 is ready for them. For a start Facebook is one such application taking full advantage of HTML5, and promoting its use for Facebook apps.

The key areas of HTML5 that are supported across mainstream mobile browsers are offline storage, geolocation, multimedia, graphics (canvas), touch events and large parts of CSS3. The mobile HTML5 site provides a list of mobile browser capabilities.

In the past marketers are argued that presence on App Stores adds value to “brand awareness”, and whilst this is true, there is nothing stopping an organisation having using both native apps and HTML. For example, take LloydsTSB. You can download their app, which effectively once downloaded then runs a “browser” version of their Internet banking service.

There are also some great libraries out there that make cross platform mobile development much easier and provide features that make your web applications feel much more like a native phone app. JQueryMobile is a great example.

So what are you waiting for?

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