Archive for February, 2012

HTML5 will be key to a MAD world

February 16, 2012

According to researchers, over 5 billion devices connect to the Internet today and by 2020 over 22 billion devices including 6 billion phones, 2 billion TVs will be connected. By 2014 sales of new internet connected devices excluding PC’s will be over 500 million units a year.

We’re moving into a connected world where people expect internet access any time, any place and on anything, and so many of us will have Multiple Access Devices (MAD).

Therefore it still amazes me to find large corporate with a separate Internet strategy and Mobile strategy. I won’t name and shame but you know who you are! What next, a strategy for tablets and a separate one for Internet TVs?

One of the key principles of HTML5 is that it aims to give you the tools to write once, deploy everywhere; that is, to create applications and content that can be developed to run appropriately for every device. Of course where it makes sense an application might need to take advantage of a specific devices capability (e.g. a camera or GPS), but even then conditional behaviour can be developed to provide such differentiation rather than develop a whole new application for a specific devices.

One of the key enablers here is adopting an approach whereby the content/application VIEW (look and feel) is fully controlled by CSS, and namely version 3. CSS3 has a number of features that allow you to control layout and look and feel according to screen dimensions/estate. The enabling technology is Media Queries, which allow you to create different VIEWS of an application based on screen dimensions. I’ll be writing more about this soon.

Creating a MAD (Multiple access devices) strategy is not all about technology though. Organisations will have to monitor and sometimes drive changes in customer behaviour, look at how much more time youth spend on smartphones than watching TV or in fact any other device. With each person having multiple access devices, different devices will likely to be used specifically for different parts of the customer buying cycle. If a purchase requires research and thought then most likely this will be done on PC’s/Laptops, for instant updates (news, stock prices, weather, scores and so on) smartphones for entertainment maybe tablets will prevail.

There are many more challenges to be discussed and I hope to cover these in more depth in follow up blogs, but for now small or large organisations need to create a single MAD strategy that encompasses customer/user needs, monitor behavioural changes and trends and investigate the capabilities of enabling technologies.

The change will be profound, as organisations realise the total impact to processes, skills and technologies to really master Customer Experience in a MAD world, a journey which the visionaries have already started.

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HTML5: The right time right place for mobile?

February 9, 2012

Most people by now understand that main challenge for developing mobile applications is creating a solution that runs on as many platforms as possible. This challenge can range from supporting browsers that only support text, up to fully fledged smartphones.

For organisations that are targeting users in the developed world, many are simplifying this challenge to target smartphones only. However even here to create local native applications requires solutions that support Apple’s iOS, Windows, Android and Java (Blackberry).

There are many mobile development platforms available to assist with creating “write once deploy everywhere” apps. The main constrains here are that you end up with deployments to many different stores, and that quite often still write platform specific code to take advantage of platform specific features.

HTML5 has long been a strong candidate for mobile applications, but is it ready? Are mobile browsers upto date with HTML5?

The answer to this question can be a simple “No”, no mobile browser supports the full HTML5 specification. Or a “Maybe” depending on what features (camera, phone book and GPS) of the phone you require you may have support from HTML5.

Push that up to a resounding “Yes”, if you want to move an application that currently runs on the web to run on mobile. Of course, I should also caveat the above with ‘there are grey areas’ in between these responses, not very helpful I know.

For corporates looking to support mobile users with line of business applications I believe there are some great examples that prove HTML5 is ready for them. For a start Facebook is one such application taking full advantage of HTML5, and promoting its use for Facebook apps.

The key areas of HTML5 that are supported across mainstream mobile browsers are offline storage, geolocation, multimedia, graphics (canvas), touch events and large parts of CSS3. The mobile HTML5 site provides a list of mobile browser capabilities.

In the past marketers are argued that presence on App Stores adds value to “brand awareness”, and whilst this is true, there is nothing stopping an organisation having using both native apps and HTML. For example, take LloydsTSB. You can download their app, which effectively once downloaded then runs a “browser” version of their Internet banking service.

There are also some great libraries out there that make cross platform mobile development much easier and provide features that make your web applications feel much more like a native phone app. JQueryMobile is a great example.

So what are you waiting for?

The end of Apple?

February 2, 2012

We are clearly in the web age an era that has turned everyone into readers and publishers of free content. In this era we have seen the rise of open source, free software and the move to software and services freely available in the cloud.

Yet in the “free age”, Apple maintain a huge client base locked into its proprietary and closed hardware, operating systems and stores. When Steve Jobs returned to Apple, even the great Bill Gates proclaimed that the world had changed, and that Apple would not survive with Steve Jobs maintaining the company’s control over platforms from end to end.

Despite this Apple is a huge success. Is it likely to last?

As a techie, I’d hope not, because we do want to be able to upgrade our hardware, we want the option to use any suppliers’ parts and we want the same to be true of our software. Do we care what the hardware looks like as long as it’s fast and powerful, not really.

However as a consumer, too much choice is not necessarily a good thing. As a consumer, we are in a world where things get replaced rather than fixed or upgraded. For the majority style is every bit if not more important than features, and customer experience does matter.

How quickly and easily I can use my device has become more important than whether it has all the latest and best features. Going back to one store is easier than have to search several for apps and music.

Apple started with some engineering innovation, and when Steve Jobs was first ousted focused heavily on engineering; this was its downfall in the late eighties. However with the return of Steve Jobs, and his partnership with Jonathon Ives, a return to a focus on customer experience and design revived the ailing technology company.

So although it pains me to see Apple thrive in such a closed environment they really do highlight that style, ease of use and the overall customer experience really does matter to consumers. Hence I would not forecast the end of Apple for some time in the near future unless it loses its way again to “engineering”.